Prevalence and characteristics of sexual functioning among sexually experienced middle to late adolescents. (2014)

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teen guysCOMMENTS: Limp boners and low desire in teenage males are things that should make everyone take notice as being extremely surprising. This study found rates of sexual dysfunction in 16-21 year olds that surpassed the rates found in adults. Especially surprising were the high rates of sexual problems in males (54%):

  • Erectile Dysfunction - 27%
  • Low sexual desire - 24%
  • Problems with orgasm - 11%

Note: the above percentages are about twice those found in this study of men ages 40-80. Keep in mind that in the 1940s Kinsey found that prevalence of impotence was less than 1% in men under 19 years of age, 3% of men under 45 years, 7% less than 55 years and 25% by the age of 75 years.

THE STUDY:

  • These data indicate that similar proportions of male and female adolescents (54% and 51%, respectively) can be described as having a problem in sexual functioning, and thus, rates do not reveal the sex disparity that so consistently characterizes studies of adults. It is unclear why we found such high rates overall, but especially the high rates among both male and female participants rather than female participants alone, as is common in the adult literature.
  • Overall, 61 of the 114 male adolescents (53.5%) were classified as reporting symptoms indicative of a sexual problem. Erectile dysfunction and low desire were the most common problems for male participants. (Emphasis added)

Needless  to say, the researchers did not examine internet porn use or sex toy use, the two variables that have become common in the last decades. Fumbling and unsatisfying sex are traditionally not rare among teens, who are still learning the fine points of sex. However, it's likely that limp boners and low desire males were once as rare in human teens as they still are among young bulls, stallions or rams. Something has changed, and these sexologists don't even consider the most obvious possiblities.


 

J Sex Med. 2014 Mar;11(3):630-41. doi: 10.1111/jsm.12419.

O'Sullivan LF1, Brotto LA, Byers ES, Majerovich JA, Wuest JA.

FULL STUDY - PDF

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Little is known about problems in sexual functioning among young people, despite the high rates found in adult samples. It is unclear which problems are most prevalent or how common sexual distress is for young people experiencing problems.

AIMS:

This study aims to assess the prevalence, range, and correlates of sexual problems and distress among a sample of adolescents (16-21 years).

METHODS:

Participants (mean age 19.2) were recruited from community and area high schools. Male adolescents (n = 114) completed online the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT). Female adolescents (n = 144) completed the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Both completed the Female Sexual Distress Scale (FSDS) and the measures of background, relationship characteristics, and sexual histories.

MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURES:

Clinical cutoff scores on the IIEF, PEDT, FSFI, and FSDS were used to determine whether there was a significant sexual problem.

RESULTS:

Adolescents reported extensive sexual experience, most in relationship contexts. Half of the sample (51.1%) reported a sexual problem; 50.0% reported clinically significant levels of distress associated with it. Similar rates of problems and distress were found among male and female adolescents. For the most part, adolescent characteristics, backgrounds, and experience were not associated with adolescents' sexual problems.

CONCLUSION:

Sexual problems are clearly prevalent among adolescents, and distressing to many who experience them, emphasizing a strong need to develop programs to address this issue.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Female Sexual Dysfunction; Male Sexual Dysfunction; Sexual Distress; Sexual Health in Young Men and Women