The Porn Debate

Printer-friendly version

In essence all YBOP's articles can be classified as arguments for the existence of Internet porn addiction and porn-induced problems. However, the following articles were written as a response to Psychology Today blog posts, questionable studies or as updates on the relevant advances in addiction medicine.

Also see - Questionable & Misleading Studies

The chief "unique vulnerability" behind problems today's young porn users are reporting is likely to be the adolescent brain colliding with today's super-potent online sexual stimuli.

American Society of Addiction Medicine agrees to disagree with DSM

America’s top addiction experts have just released a new definition of addiction confirming that sex (and porn) addictions are genuine addictions.

Brain research on Internet addiction points in only one direction

Since we wrote Ominous News for Porn Users: Internet Addiction Atrophies Brains, which addressed recent online videogame addiction research, a tide of brand new research has been rolling in from around the world addressing Internet addiction.

Can you spot these 5 familiar myths about porn addiction?

Ever heard someone claim that the concept of Internet porn addiction is pseudoscience? Chances are you'll also hear various popular myths in support of the claim. However, a single neurobiological discovery invalidates these "sciency" rationalizations

A discussion of  “Pornography addiction – a supranormal stimulus considered in the context of neuroplasticity” by Donald L Hilton, MD, in Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology.

Sex addiction requires real people; porn addiction requires a screen.

While porn addiction remains hidden under the umbrella of sex addiction, users who develop symptoms are in a precarious position. They have to figure things out for themselves.

Care to weigh in on Internet pornography/cybersex addiction?

The DSM-5 should move everything related to Internet addictions (gaming, cybersex, social media and pornography) to 'Substance Use and Addictive Disorders' and place it under the jurisdiction of addiction specialists who understand that Internet addiction is one condition—the product of plastic brain changes, and generally reversible.

Did addiction politics leave us stranded on a slippery slope?

In 1992, a political skirmish took place in the field of medicine, which has discouraged deeper understanding of human sexuality. According to David E. Smith MD, past president of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), doctors bartered away the recognition of sex addiction as a pathology in order to address a more immediate risk.

Internet porn studies rely on anectodal evidence and have no control groups. What can informal control groups of former porn users show us?

Curious about Internet porn? Ask an addiction specialist.

All Internet addictions have the power to alter brains, with negative consequences for children and adults

Both sexual anorexia and sex addiction can co-exist. This article is a reply to one of David Ley's many attacks on us and the science of Internet porn addiction.

Porn alters sexual behavior; so do other things

Is today's porn driving some young users toward riskier behavior while others are shut out because of the symptoms of their heavy porn use?

Tools to measure porn’s effects on the brain are here.

What exactly what would brain researchers be looking for in porn users' brains? Why hasn't this research been done already? And why do diagnostic labels matter anyway?

Time to acknowledge the link between sex and brain science

Unless the DSM reconsiders, if you fall into compulsive porn use, your condition "doesn't exist" and you will be treated, if at all, for the unpleasant symptoms of addiction (such as anxiety, ED, depression, concentration problems) instead of your actual pathology.

Prepare students to deal with porn; teach them about their brains

Those giving up porn are also beginning to shape our culture. Like soldiers returning from the front, they offer some of the pithiest and most moving insights into the realities of life with, and without, highspeed porn.

Academia prepares to 'accentuate the positive' in new porn periodical

If there were ever a human phenomenon in need of serious objective investigation, Internet porn use is surely it. However, the board of the "Porn Studies Journal" appears to lack the detachment and expertise necessary to fulfill this critical role.

"Once recovered, I'm guarding my sex drive like Fort Knox"

Education that helps kids cope with today's Internet porn phenomenon is a great idea. But let's not waste a brilliant educational opportunity trying to sort good porn from bad porn.

An open letter to Simon Lajeunesse

Simon Lajeunesse is a researcher who couldn’t find any “porn virgins” to do a study on the effects of Internet porn. He concluded porn was harmless. We give him some basic understanding of the problem

Ex-porn user outlines the challenge of explaining porn's genuine risks

The 'Pornography Consumption Effect Scale' (PCES) seems to measure little but its creators' enthusiasm for demonstrating that porn use is "positive." Some of the resulting conclusions are beyond belief.

Longitudinal studies are needed to reveal morphing porn tastes

SPAN lab researchers used pre-Internet sexual-addiction theory, as well as the term "hypersexuals," to describe problem porn users, thereby implying that they are discovering useful information about sex addicts—without using the term. Yet there are several problems with this effort.

SPAN lab once again ignores their actual findings to concoct propaganda for public consumption. Three peer-reviewed papers support YBOP's critique.

An unbelievable propaganda piece masquerading as a review. The analysis completely dismantles it, line by line.

SPAN lab finally finds a control group for their 2013 EEG study. The results indicate desensitization, SPAN lab spins the results.

Joshua Grubb's re-labels a porn addiction questionnaire as "perceived porn addiction". Perhaps the most egregious piece of propaganda we have witnessed.

A 2016 article for Skeptic magazine, co-authored with Philip Zimbardo PhD

A 2016 article for Skeptic magazine, co-authored with Philip Zimbardo PhD. This was our response to Marty Klein's response to our original article.