Pornography use as a risk marker for an aggressive pattern of behavior among sexually reactive children and adolescents (2009)

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J Am Psychiatr Nurses Assoc. 2009 Jan;14(6):442-53. doi: 10.1177/1078390308327137.
 

Source

William F. Connell School of Nursing, Boston College, Massachusetts.

Abstract

Sexually reactive children and adolescents (SRCAs), sometimes referred to as juvenile sexual offenders, may be more vulnerable and likely to experience damaging effects from pornography use because they are a high-risk group for a variety of aggressive behaviors. The purpose of this study is to describe the characteristics of those who use pornography and those who do not and to examine the associations between pornography use and aggressive behaviors among SRCAs.

This secondary analysis used a descriptive, exploratory design to study 160 SRCAs. Chi-square and individual odds ratio analyses were employed to examine the associations between use of pornography and aggressive behaviors. SRCAs who used pornography were more likely to display aggressive behaviors than their nonusing cohort. Recommendations for nurses and mental health professionals encountering these children and adolescents are offered.

From - The Impact of Internet Pornography on Adolescents: A Review of the Research (2012):

In a similar study discussed previously, Alexy et al. (2009) studied the pornography consumption patterns of juvenile sexual offenders as they related to various forms of aggressive behavior. Those who were consumers of pornography were more likely to display forms of aggressive behaviors such as theft, truancy, manipulating others, arson, and forced sexual intercourse.

A similar study was conducted by Alexy et al. in 2009. These authors studied 160 sexually reactive children and adolescents (SRCA) and their associations between sexually explicit material and sexually aggressive behavior. “The SRCA population consists of high-risk individuals, specifically, young individuals with a predisposition for aggression” (p. 450). Using a descriptive, exploratory design, this study found that SRCAs who used sexually
explicit material were more likely “to engage in coerced vaginal penetration and forced sexual acts such as oral or digital penetration, to express sexually aggressive remarks (obscenities), and to engage in sex with animals” (p. 450) than those who did not.